The PC is Over


#127

^ You keep using your computer, rather than switching to a inferior (as in more limited and less versatile, productive and powerful) device such as a tablet.

And enough with the moronic “only 1% of people need power” myth, already. Gamers need to upgrade their PCs every few years and they definitely make up far more than 1% of people.


#129

I’ve been reading similar posts about the post-PC era since 2006 (regardless of the dawn of tablets and whatnot).
The only thing which ever happened since then is that PCs have become more powerful.
In a nutshell, the statement “The PC is Over” is opinionated utter nonsense.


#135

there are 3 flaws to the argument the the PC is over for most users.

1- offices will continue to use PC for they won’t want their employees using their own tablets with “who-knows-what-software(malware)” on it. And there is zero advantage in using tablets. Actually what will likely happen is one PC/server will service multiple users, each with their own monitor, etc. And offices are still going to be a plenty for some time.

2- virtual worlds will increasingly become more popular not only for entertainment but also for communication, it’ll gradually become more worthwhile to meet online then offline. And that will continue to require the greatest performance available for quite some time.

3- the upcoming rise of A.I.s and distributed computing (I.E. for large projects), lending/selling/donating computing cycles; will basically mean: the better processing-power/price ratio the better, no matter what the individual processing-power requirements are.


#136

This is a fantastic post. This is a really old article and yet it has been a perfect example of technology and how we use desktops and smartphones today. I mainly use my smartphone and rarely have a need to use a laptop or desktop (other than screen size, if needed, to reduce eye-stain for long-periods of time). I (for the most part) dread using anything other than my phone simply because it’s just convenient than sitting at a desktop or carrying around a laptop. I can do work on the go, and I do so increasingly. I never see a person at the gym on a treadmill use a laptop. Lol. But a tablet or phone? Constantly; music, movies, minor work/e-mails, all while working out.

I hear some people say you can’t do work efficiently on your phone. That’s just pure laziness, then. I’ve completed in-depth reports, analyzed data, have made charts and graphs, all on my phone. Even presentations (with the addition of casting my screen to a TV to present the item to others) just fine and so have my colleagues. You just have to get used to it and use the right apps. We’re in the 21st century. Not 1994. Many offices now mainly just use smartphones and tablets. I have seen this. But I have also seen laptop use. Not sure of the last time I even saw a desktop at any office.